PPC Newsletter Dec 27 2011

Preparing For 2012 – Vital Water Storage

Hi Folks

2012 will likely have a lot of surprises for all of us so let’s be practical and keep our feet on the ground as we get ready for whatever’s coming our way (like a solar storm that could cut off electricity all of a sudden).

Here’s a great example.

Subscriber Denise just spent a goodly amount of time sharing how she copes with the issue of being prepared.

So…in her own words…

Hi Michael,

I love your newsletter and what you are doing for others thru your good works as the Portland Preparedness Center. I’ve been a subscriber of your Earth Change Report and New Earth News too. I truly appreciate your efforts to help mankind.

I’d like to share some everyday practical things I’ve done to help me prepare when money is not available. The recession did a number on our business and we went from having a three month supply of emergency income back to living paycheck to paycheck. Living in this way does not always allow a person to spend more money on getting prepared. However, the foundation for preparedness is having the right mindset. When our minds are prepared, we can do anything we set our minds too.

Every week I decide I’m doing something to help me prepare. When I cannot buy something, I do something. One week I focused on water. Water is the one thing we cannot live without and need more than food after three days. One day I decided that I needed more water to store but could not afford to buy more water containers to store them in. I asked myself what I currently had on hand that would allow me to store water in a safe and effective way that did not cost me anymore money. Two things popped into my head immediately:

1. Ice. I have ice trays in my freezer and an ice maker (that is currently not in use but I still have the large ice cube holder in the freezer.) I now have six ice trays that are always filled and a holder that I keep and use ice in. I know it sounds like a small and simple thing to do that really does not amount to much, but it is BIG! Why, because small ideas leads to larger ones.  My next question was: What else do I have that I can use?

2. Pitchers, decanters, buckets and such. I had two glass containers that were empty, mainly because they were being stored. Summer was over and I used these to make lemonade in the summer. I now use them year round for water. I always have water, that we drink on a daily basis, in my fridge. This was a habit changer, and I make sure that the water in our fridge is being used and replenished everyday. This way I know the water is good to drink and since the water is refrigerated, I’m not concerned about it going bad.

Now that I made arrangements for an extra one day supply of water that I could manage in my own refrigerator, that lead to other ideas. OTHER CONTAINERS.

Since we have animals, I now make sure that I keep an extra bucket of water for them. This is used every other day. It’s important to note here that water will go bad when left in conditions that do not preserve it, however; a one or two day replenishment that is recycled appropriately under the conditions in which it is being used is just fine. In other words, water stored in the fridge for human consumption is just as safe and effective as a bucket of water stored for one day exposed to elements for an animal to drink out of.

3. What about water used for hygiene? If the power goes out and I need water to be clean, what are my options? This is a loaded question with many answers. I’ll keep it short here. My answer to this was simply, stay clean everyday and make sure my environment is clean everyday so if and when the power goes out I can focus on moving forward instead of having to first address a piles of laundry and unclean rooms and family members that I cannot clean.

This was also a habit changer. While my family and I were already in the habit of bathing regularly, my house and laundry were not addressed on a daily basis. They are now. We are a family of four and laundry for us piles up quickly. Needless to say, I do laundry everyday. I know it may sound laborious but it’s more laborious to devote and entire day off to cleaning.

My schedule is very busy and I work two jobs outside of my home just to make ends meet. I have the mindset that my appliances serve me, not the other way around. So, before I leave to go to work, I start the washer. When I come home, (or another family member makes it home before me) one of us puts it in dryer and if there’s more to wash, (remember your towels and bedding ), then that goes in next.

So, everyday, at least one load of laundry is washed. For those in the habit of having a laundry day, I suggest everyday as being laundry day. The same goes for washing dishes and cleaning the bathroom. If and when the power goes out, do you really want to deal with a dirty, smelly bathroom on top of everything else? I know I don’t.

I have many other ideas that I’d be happy to share. I’m stopping here so the email stays relatively short.

Hope this helps, and happy preparing,
Denise

Well said Denise.

You’ve prompted me to adopt some of these practical ideas – but I’m not sure that the ice will make it past the Canadian Dry Ginger Ale and Brandy:-)

Best wishes to all for 2012.

Sincerely.

Michael Knight.

Portland Preparedness Center.

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Anteros Oberon
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